Some Common Questions

What is the mission of Scouting?

To prepare young to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

What do Scouts do?

Some of the best things about Cub Scouting are the activities the boys and girls (and sometimes you) get to do: camping, hiking, racing model cars, going on field trips, or doing projects that help our community and the people who live here. Cub Scouting means “doing.” All our activities are designed to have the youths doing something and by “doing” they learn some very valuable life lessons.

Do the parents have a role?

Yes. As a program for the entire family, Cub Scouting can teach your child a wholesome system of values and beliefs while building and strengthening relationships among family members. Scouting gives you a pretty neat platform to equip your son or daughter. We provide other mentors to help your child grow, but you are also an important part of his or her development in Scouting. Your role decreases as your child gets older, and he or she becomes more self-reliant.

But your role in the Pack can be passive. We don't expect a parent to leap right in. But, be warned, Cub Scouting might impact you as it impacts your son or daughter, and you might eventually get ‘the fever’ that many of our leaders got from Scouting. But you are encouraged to go at your own pace.

Can my daughter join Cub Scouts?

Absolutely! The BSA has recently voted to make Scouting a fully co-ed program. Starting March 1 2018, girls in Kindergarten through 4th grade can join a Cub Scout Pack. Because 5th graders cross over to Boy Scouts in the spring - and because Boy Scouts is not transitioning to a co-ed program until 2019 - girls who are currently in 5th grade will not be able to join this year, but will be able to join a Boy Scout Troop in the future.

How old (or young) can a youth be to join?

Cub Scouting is for boys and girls in Kindergarten through fifth grades, or 6 to 10 years of age. Children who are older than 10, or who have completed the fifth grade, can no longer join Cub Scouts, but they are eligible to join a Boy Scout Troop.

How do our Scouts achieve their goals?

Activities are used to achieve the aims of Scouting—citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness. Many of the activities happen in the den (with the children in their grade) or with the entire Pack (with all the grade levels). Our Scouts always have “Go-and-See's” and plenty of outdoor and indoor activities to help them achieve goals.

What supplies and equipment are needed?

At minimum, each youth in Cub Scouting will need a uniform and will receive a handbook. Each year, the handbook changes, as does the cap and neckerchief, but other uniform parts remain the same for at least the first three years. When a Scout enters a Webelos den, he or she may need to obtain a new uniform if the parents in the den opt for the khaki-and-olive uniform.

Annual dues are reasonable and no child is turned away for inability to pay. Handbooks and advancement items are provided as part of your annual dues. New uniforms usually total about $40.00; used uniforms are often available – please contact us. Additional fees are minimal and reasonable, especially if you participate in the Pack’s Fall Wreath Sale. The Pack and Council also have Scholarship programs designed to ensure that every child who wants to join and participate can do so.

Next page in our Scouting 101 tour...

Getting Started